Tagged: Republicans

Reflecting on the GOP

With only a few days remaining until the election is decided on Tuesday next week, I reflect on a long campaign trail that has been among the most divisive elections to date. If President Obama wins, he could face the prospect of a much tougher second term as Republicans struggle to accept yet another loss from the Democratic incumbent. But should this be the case, Republicans have a great deal of internal restructuring to do before the 2016 election comes around. As witnessed throughout these past four years, the GOP has been anything except consistent in their party ranks. From the emergence of the Neocons  at the start of George W. Bush’s first term in office, to the moderates, the extreme right fundamentalists, the libertarians, and recently, the Tea Party activists, Republicans have yet to agree on a common party identity that they can all rally behind. This is problematic because while it might be clear to them that President Obama’s policies are not the way to go, it’s not entirely clear to everyone else what the Republican vision of the next four years in the US ought to be.

We also shouldn’t forget to mention what an utter disaster the Republican primaries turned out to be. Barring aside Continue reading

Voter ID laws disenfranchise Americans

Republican legislatures throughout the country have been pushing for Voter ID laws to stop what is, according to them, an epidemic of voter fraud.  Studies conducted on the subject of voter fraud reveal that this, however, is not the case. A new study published by News21 found that voter fraud rarely occurs in the US, with only 10 documented cases of in-person fraud recorded in the US since 2000, which, split between the 146 million registered voters, equates to about one case per 15 million people. Voter fraud occurs more commonly with absentee ballots or voter registration, neither of which would at all be impacted by the enacting of Republican sponsored legislation. The reason in-person voter fraud is so rare is because of the large risk and small reward associated with it. For example, the punishment for fraud in Connecticut for those ineligible, or those voting twice, is Continue reading