Tagged: Obama

Ready or Not?

Elections are over and now there is no question that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) will go into implementation. H.R. 3590 was nothing if not controversial. Introduced on September 17th 2009, signed by President Obama on March 23rd 2010 without bipartisan support, and upheld by a surprising 5:4 majority in the United States Supreme Court two years later on June 28th 2012, the Affordable Care Act has come a long way. Schoolhouse Rock never let on that it took Bill that long to become a law, and while some would have preferred it, not everyone was cheering when Nancy Pelosi came running down the capitol steps spreading the word that Bill passed.

While most Americans would agree that some type of healthcare reform is necessary, it is a drastically different story when it comes to how to reform healthcare, thus strong arguments were expressed for and against PPACA. Yet, polls are still showing the public to be very much torn on the issue of healthcare reform. Consider a Gallup poll taken following the SCOTUS ruling. The poll attempted to gauge the public’s perception of how Continue reading

The first presidential debate hurdle

All eyes were on the Denver University arena last Wednesday for the first presidential debate between President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Pre-debate polling had consistently been showing Obama with a slight advantage. The day of the debate, Rasmussen polling showed Obama two percentage points ahead of Romney with 49 percent compared to 47 percent of likely voter support. How much of a difference the first debate will ultimately have on the election is up for deliberation, however, the Rasmussen poll shows that Romney and Obama’s positions have now flipped with Romney leading 49 percent to 47 percent. Sunday’s poll is the first to Continue reading

Understanding the middle class vote

With November 2nd just around the corner, President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney are doubling down on campaign efforts to gather support from a broad base of Americans. While the two parties typically cater to different demographics, this year both held conventions focused on reaching the ever growing number of self-identified independents, more specifically, the 35 percent within the middle class.

Vying for the votes of the same crowd, both parties attempted to surge ahead of the other coming out of their conventions by clearly distinguishing their roadmap for the nation from the other party. Republicans stressed that Continue reading

Brian from Ohio: A tale of sound and fury, signifying nothing

For all the talk by political pundits about how this election will be decided on important issues like the economy or health care, you’d be hard pressed to find evidence that candidates actually have anything substantive to say on those issues if you looked solely at the ads they pay for. Examples are the easiest (and most entertaining) way to illustrate this, so take a look at a 30-second ad paid for by the Obama for America campaign, available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgjTYFE2aYc&feature=share&list=PL7D1934B46A0575CE.

Here is what the advertisement tells the viewers: Brian from Ohio was an autoworker who got laid off and was worried about how he would support his son and wife. President Obama restructured the auto industry, thereby providing Brian with a job that he is extremely grateful to have. The story is simple and given to viewers with Continue reading